NYNHP Modeled Data


This page provides GIS and other data developed by the Heritage Program available for download. These are usually derived data (such as spatial models) and are intended for use and analysis by those knowledgeable in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Many of these layers can be viewed online at the Energy and Biodiversity mapping site, the Environmental Resource Mapper, or New York Nature Explorer.

Each download consists of a ZIP file containing a PDF with metadata for the layer and the file(s) associated with the GIS layer itself. The files are provided in two formats, ArcGIS layer package and GeoTIFF for rasters and ArcGIS layer package and shapefile for vector datasets. If using ESRI products such as ArcMap or ArcGIS Pro, use the layer package as that maintains an appropriate color scheme for display.

Available Layers


Landscape Condition Assessment Model

This GIS layer was developed as part of our ongoing Wetlands Assessment work.

Landscape Condition Assessment (LCA) model ver. 2

The layer depicts the presumed impacts from a suite of anthropogenic stressors across the landscape of the state. The 13 input stressors include five categories of roads from ALIS, active rail lines, three categories of development intensity and one representation of open spaces from CCAP, electric and natural gas corridors, and cropland from CropScape. A sigmoid decay function was applied to each stressor to model the attenuation of ecological effects away from its footprint. The model synthesizes the results of these "decay footprints" at the 30 m x 30 m pixel scale - each pixel has a score representing cumulative stress. The effectiveness of the model for estimating wetland quality (Level 1 assessment) has been evaluated with field work at two levels of sampling intensity and shown to be effective. Documentation and model development are described in Appendix A of the New York State Wetland Condition Assessment Final Report (PDF, 2.9 MB).

The LCA model was used in Supporting Actionable Decision-Making For Wetland Permitting In New York From Urban To Rural Environments (PDF, 7.3 MB).


Stacked Distribution Models

These GIS layers are for summarized (stacked) species distribution models. These were developed with support from NYSERDA; the project is discussed a little more on our page discussing prioritization tools.

Modeled Rare Species: All Rare Species

This layer depicts the results of 379 species distribution models, combined into one layer. For each rare species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 32.

Modeled Rare Species: Rare Animals

This layer depicts the results of 126 species distribution models of rare animals, combined into one layer. For each rare species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 17.

Modeled Rare Species: Rare Plants

This layer depicts the results of 209 species distribution models of rare plants, combined into one layer. For each rare species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 23.

Modeled Rare Species: State-Listed Species

This layer depicts the results of 232 species distribution models of State-listed rare plants and animals, combined into one layer. For each species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 24.

Modeled Rare Species: Rare Vertebrates

This layer depicts the results of 66 species distribution models of rare vertebrate animals (including reptiles, mammals, fish, birds, amphibians), combined into one layer. For each species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 16.

Modeled Rare Species: Bat Hibernacula

This layer depicts the results of 2 species distribution models of bat hibernacula, combined into one layer. For each species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 2.

Modeled Rare Species: Rare Birds

This layer depicts the results of 23 species distribution models of rare birds combined into one layer. For each species, known locations (either summer nesting or overwintering habitat) were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 10.

Modeled Rare Species: Rare Invertebrates

This layer depicts the results of 60 species distribution models of rare invertebrates (including beetles, butterflies and moths, crawfish and mussels, and dragonflies and damselflies) combined into one layer. For each species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 10.

Modeled Rare Species: Rare Aerial Insects

This layer depicts the results of 44 species distribution models of rare invertebrates (including butterflies, moths, dragonflies, and damselflies) combined into one layer. For each species, known locations were used to predict suitable habitat throughout the state. Locations then identified as suitable were then added across all species, creating the layer shown here. A higher number indicates more species were predicted to have suitable habitat at that location. The maximum number of overlapping models at any location is 10.


Migratory Bird Stopover Models

This table includes other types of distribution models and layers related to forest connectivity. These layers can be viewed in an online mapping system and were developed with support from NYSERDA.

Modeled Migratory Bird Stopovers: Fall Migrants

This layer depicts the results for models predicting the fall stopover habitat for 28 species of migratory birds. For each species, known stopover locations were obtained from the eBird database and used to predict the probability of occurrence throughout the state using landcover data. The probability of occurrence for each species was rescaled from 0 to 1 and the values for each species were added together. The higher the number in a grid cell, the more species are predicted to stop over within that cell during their species-specific migration window.

Modeled Migratory Bird Stopovers: Spring Migrants

This layer depicts the results for models predicting the spring stopover habitat for 28 species of migratory birds. For each species, known stopover locations were obtained from the eBird database and used to predict the probability of occurrence throughout the state using landcover data. The probability of occurrence for each species was rescaled from 0 to 1 and the values for each species were added together. The higher the number in a grid cell, the more species are predicted to stop over within that cell during their species-specific migration window.


Summer Bat distribution and Terrestrial Connectivity

This table includes other Bat information and layers related to forest connectivity. These layers can be viewed in an online mapping system and were developed with support from NYSERDA.

Modeled Bat Summer Distributions

This layer depicts the predicted richness (number) of up to 3 species of bat that occur in New York during the summer. The probability of suitable habitat for each species was modeled and converted to the predicted presence (1) or absence (0) of suitable habitat. These layers were then summed across all species to yield the number of species for which suitable habitat was predicted to be present in each cell.

Terrestrial Connectivity: Priority Large Forested Areas

This layer depicts the matrix forest blocks selected by The Nature Conservancy as the most viable examples of the dominant forest communities throughout the state. Matrix sites are large contiguous areas whose size and natural condition allow for the maintenance of ecological processes, viable occurrences of matrix forest communities, embedded large and small patch communities, and embedded species populations.

Terrestrial Connectivity: Forest Block Linkages and Linkage Zones

Linkages: This layer depicts the Least Cost Paths (LCP) among forest blocks; one model of the best way to maintain connectivity for the populations of plants and animals of these forests. A least cost path balances travel distance and ease of travel -- here designated as the amount of natural land within 1 kilometer. The goal is to describe the most permeable part of the landscape between a pair of forest blocks. LCPs may help identify habitat stepping stones, riparian zones, or even wide swaths of natural land and thus should be viewed within the context of the landscape, not simply as a line on the ground. Linkage Zones: This layer depicts the Conditional Minimum Transit Cost linkage zones among forest blocks. A zone between two forest blocks depicts the area around all the paths represented by the cost of the single LCP plus 20%. The goal is to describe the most permeable part of the landscape between a pair of forest blocks. The LCP and the associated linkage zone may help identify habitat stepping stones, riparian zones, or even wide swaths of natural land and thus should be viewed within the context of the landscape.

Terrestrial Connectivity: Percent Forest in the Landscape

This layer depicts the amount of forest in the landscape. The layer is based on the 2006 version of the National Land Cover Database and shows, for any location, the amount of forested land within 300 meters.


Stream Quality

This table contains stream quality information. These layers can be viewed in an online mapping system. They were originally developed as part of our Freshwater Blueprint project and were developed with support from NYSERDA.

Stream Quality Information: Predicted Mussel Richness

This layer depicts stream segments in which one or more species of mussel are predicted to occur, based on 2750 separate records for the 39 species known to currently occur in New York.

Stream Quality Information: Predicted EPT Richness

This layer depicts the predicted number of species of mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), and caddisflies (Trichoptera) for streams in New York, based on the NYS DEC Stream Biomonitoring Unit’s database of aquatic macroinvertebrate samples.

Stream Quality Information: Floodplain Complexes

This layer depicts floodplain cores and corridors along the larger streams in the state. Floodplain cores are contiguous areas of natural cover greater than 150 acres within the Active River Area. Floodplain corridors are undeveloped and natural lands within the same stream reach or adjacent to these cores.


Energy Development

This table has GIS layers related to energy development in New York. These were developed with support from NYSERDA to support the balance of energy development and biodiversity conservation. These layers are available for viewing online.

FAA Turbine Locations

This layer depicts existing and proposed wind turbines in New York State, as provided by the Federal Aviation Administration. Wind turbine cases from 1990 through January 2013 are included in this layer, with duplicate cases removed.

Elevation

This layer depicts topography throughout New York in terms of elevation above sea level.

Distance to Power Transmission

This layer depicts, in broad bands, how far any part of the landscape is from major power transmission lines.

Marcellus Shale Depth to Base

This layer depicts the distance from ground surface to the bottom of the Marcellus Shale layer, in groups of 1000 foot intervals.

Marcellus Shale Thickness

This layer depicts the thickness of the Marcellus Shale Formation in New York, in groups of 50 foot intervals.

Utica Shale Depth

This layer depicts the distance from ground surface to the bottom of the Marcellus Shale layer, in groups of 1000 foot intervals.

Utica Shale Thickness

This layer depicts the thickness of the Marcellus Shale Formation in New York, in groups of 50 foot intervals.


Other Data Sources

Other data layers displayed on the Energy and Biodiversity Mapper were taken directly from other sources. These sources are fully documented in the metadata for each layer but links are provided below to have it all in one place.

Resilient Stream Networks

This layer depicts complex, connected stream networks coded by resilience based on length and the number of size, gradient, and temperature classes.

TNC Eastern Division Maps and Data Site (find NE Freshwater Resilience)

Terrestrial Landscape Resilience

This layer depicts potential terrestrial resilience to climate change, incorporating such factors as the relative complexity of geology, elevation, and landforms; wetland density, degree of connectedness, and more.

TNC Eastern Division Maps and Data Site (find NE Terrestrial Resilience 90m)

Protected Areas

This layer shows the lands protected, designated, or functioning as open space, natural areas, conservation lands, or recreational areas in New York State.

NY Protected Areas Database (NYPAD)


Jan. 14, 2021 | Updated Sept. 7, 2021, 4:39 p.m.